Skip To Main Content

Student Handbook

Each family is provided a printed copy of the Student-Parent Handbook at the start of the school year. Additional copies can be found in the main office.

This handbook outlines the expectations for dress, behavior and academic standards for all students. Any questions on policies should be directed to Dean of Students Artisha Williams.

Student Handbook

The School, Student & Parent Contract

School Policies

 STUDENT & PARENT/GUARDIAN HANDBOOK 

1341 North Cass Street 

Milwaukee, WI 53202 

PH: (414) 272-8423 FAX: (414) 272-3135 

www.saintjoanantida.org 

HOME OF THE JAGUARS 

School Colors: Maroon, White & Navy Blue 

Principal: Ms. Megan Otero 

President: Mr. René Howard-Páez 

 

MISSION STATEMENT:  

In the spirit of Saint Joan Antida Thouret’s passion to educate and empower young women, we prepare our students to lead and serve in a global society though a values-based Catholic education.  

VISION STATEMENT:  

St. Joan Antida High School embraces young women and empowers them to discover their God-given potential, give voice to their passion, and change the world.  

This handbook belongs to: _____________________________________________________________ 

 

 

Saint Joan Antida High School reserves the right to amend the handbook for just cause with proper notice given to parents/guardians if changes are made. 

A Special Note from the Principal 

Welcome to St. Joan Antida High School. We look forward to working with each and every one of you as we progress throughout the year. The SJA faculty and staff are here to assist and guide students as they strive to reach their maximum potential. Student excellence is our goal! All students will have an opportunity to take a wide variety of classes and become involved in a number of activities. I hope that you will take advantage of all the experiences and the assistance offered during the year. Getting involved in your learning and your school is the key to successful achievement!  

 

This handbook is designed to give students and parents/guardians information about school policies and procedures, and the various activities and athletics here at SJA. All of these components are what keep SJA special. I encourage students and parents/guardians to read this book together and talk over the material that it contains. Understanding these procedures and policies will help you come to school each day prepared to do your best and learn successfully. Let’s make this year another great year for everyone at SJA!  

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Welcome from the Principal / Table of Contents  

St. Joan Antida (Jeanne Antide Thouret) Our Patroness  

Faculty and Staff Directory  

Parent / Student / School Contract  

School Policies/ School Calendar/ School Schedules 

6-8 

Admissions/ Enrollment/ Attendance  

9-11 

Student ID’s/Electronics/ Cell Phones  

11-12 

Bullying and Cyberbullying  

12-13 

Conduct  

14-20 

Search & Seizure/Police Questioning & Apprehension/ School Violence Threat 

20 

Peer Mediation / Guest Behavior  

 20-21 

Disciplinary Sanctions (Including Suspension and Expulsion)  

21-22 

 Child Abuse & Neglect/Non-Harassment Policy / Non-Violence Policy  

22-23 

Public Displays of Affection/ Suicide Prevention and Awareness / Theft & Vandalism Policies 

23-24 

Academics – Grading Scale and Required Credits for Graduation 

24-25 

Technology/ Device Usage 

25-26 

Homework Policy/ Transfer Credit Policy/ Theology & Mass Policy / Academic Dishonesty Policy  

26-28 

Student Counseling Team   

28-29 

Uniform Policy / Extra-Curricular Activities  

29-30 

Tuition & Fees  

30-31 

Additional Information 

31-33 

ST. JOAN ANTIDA (Jeanne-Antide Thouret)  

Our Patroness  

Born on November 27, 1765 in the Sancey-le-Long in the Doubs region in France, Jeanne-Antide Thouret was the fifth child of a family of eight. When she was just 15 years old, her mother died leaving the responsibility of maintaining the household to Jeanne-Antide.  

As a young girl she searched for a way that would give meaning to her life and believed that it was important to respond to God's will for her. At 22 she left her home and joined the Daughters of Charity, a congregation at the service of the poor founded by St. Vincent de Paul in Paris.  

In 1793, when the French Revolution was at its height, all religious congregations were banned and Jeanne-Antide was forced to leave the Daughters of Charity. She returned to her home knowing that she would carry on what she had learned from St. Vincent de Paul. She cared for the sick, the wounded, and the poor - all of whom grew numerous during the chaos of the French Revolution. Jeanne-Antide also taught the children, helped the priests who were forced to hide, and gathered Christians in prayer.  

Because of her desire to commit herself to Christ and to her religious vocation, Jeanne-Antide fled France and escaped to Switzerland to join a different religious community where she cared for the sick. She traveled with them across Switzerland and Germany.  

When she decided to return to France she did so on foot, alone, without a passport, and through unknown places at the risk of her own life. She passed through Einsiedeln, Switzerland and reached the village of Landeron in Switzerland. It was there that representatives from the diocese of Besancon, also in exile, made a request of her to continue on to France and take in  

young girls who she should train in the same way she was trained. She was told to return to Besancon, France to teach the children and to care for the sick. Jeanne-Antide accepted this request and in 1799 she opened a school, a clinic, and a soup kitchen for the poor in Besancon. She had founded a new congregation.  

In 1810 Jeanne-Antide was called to Naples, where she and a group of sisters were faced with working in a very hierarchical social system where the wealthy never encountered the poor. Jeanne-Antide was in charge of the Hospital of the Incurables, the largest hospital in the city. The sisters often visited the poor and sick in their homes.  

In 1819, the Pope approved The Rule of Life, a book she used to guide her congregation and the life of the women who had followed her. In fact, The Rule of Life is still used today by the Sisters of Charity of St. Joan Antida.  

Jeanne-Antide died in Naples in 1826. In 1934, Pope Pius XI declared Jeanne-Antide a Saint. 

 

Faculty & Staff Directory by Department